Radioactive dating meteorite

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Also, because Earth formed as part of our sun’s family of planets – our solar system – scientists use radiometric dating to determine the ages of extraterrestrial objects, such as meteorites.These are space rocks that once orbited our sun, but later entered Earth’s atmosphere and struck our world’s surface.Many great thinkers throughout history have tried to figure out Earth’s age.For example, back in 1862, Lord Kelvin calculated how long Earth might have taken to cool from its original molten state.The differing amounts of material that were found in separate samplings of the same meteorite were unexpected.The current standard age assigned to the solar system of 4.6 billion years was determined by studying the Uranium-to-Lead decay systems in meteorites, which are assumed to have formed before the planets did.These discordant dates should not be evident if the assumption of rate constancy—which underlies radioisotope dating of igneous materials and is used to support the “billions of years” age for the solar system—is accurate.In 2005, sedimentologist Steve Austin performed a test of the lead-lead isotope clock assumptions in earth material, and found data that nullified the idea that the decay rate has been constant.

They led to the discovery that certain very heavy elements could decay into lighter elements – such as uranium decaying into lead.Only in this way could Helium have become trapped in granites, Although Brennecka and his colleagues detected only a small difference in the Uranium isotopes within the same rock, this was enough to cast a measure of doubt on a procedure that has been deemed nearly infallible for many decades.And this dovetails with other valid research which has unearthed enough other data to call into question the assumed reliability of isotope clock dating systems.Gregory Brennecka of Arizona State University and colleagues measured the relative amounts of Uranium 238 to Uranium 235 from several samples taken from the large Allende meteorite, named for the village in Mexico near where it landed in 1969.With the more sensitive instrument, they detected small differences in isotope ratios from different inclusions within the same meteorite..

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